Sport & Outdoor – Others

How to Identify and Resolve Common Issues ?

We offer a diverse range of insights on identifying and resolving common problems in sports. Our sources encompass academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays shared by seasoned athletes. :

Most 40hp and larger, carbureted two-stroke outboards use a combination fuel/oil pump mounted on the engine. The pump draws oil from an oil reservoir – mounted inside the boat – and fuel from the fuel tank. The pump injects oil into the fuel and pumps the mixture to the carburetors.
Debris such as fishing line, excessive seaweed, beer can rings, or nearly any other material can wrap around the propeller and its spindle. This increases the friction and causes the bog, preventing it from rotating to propel your boat through the water.
Spun Prop A spun prop is one of the most common reasons your powerboat may struggle to achieve appropriate speed at full throttle. This happens when the bond between your boat propeller and the prop shaft is damaged. As a result of this damage, the rubber inserts start spinning independently.
If the carburetor is new or has been rebuilt, you should set it to “factory” adjustment. You can do so by adjusting the idle mixture screws to 1.5-2 turns out, and the idle speed screw to 1-1.5 turns in. Warm the Engine Up. The engine`s running temperature directly correlates with proper air and fuel mixtures.
Every boat owner is different and how far you decide to push your marine engine is in your hands. However, running your boat at Wide-Open Throttle is not bad for your engine and can even help clear out carbon build up.
Fuel Vein Blockage

Eventually the blockage can cause a complete stoppage of fuel going into the engine, therefore causing it bog down and stop. If you suspect you have a blockage, the best cause of action is to strip down the carburettor and blow down the fuel veins with an air line or air blower.

When a boat is over-propped (the propellers have too much pitch), the outboard(s) highest achievable RPM is lower than the manufacturer`s recommended wide-open-throttle RPM, which typically is between 5000 and 6000 RPM.
If the carburetor is supplying too lean of an air/fuel mixture, the engine will run sluggish, overheat or the lean mixture could cause engine damage. If the carburetor is supplying an air/fuel mixture that is too rich, the engine may tend to load up, foul the spark plugs, run sluggish and lack power.
Typically, there`s a 12:1 or 15:1 ratio of air to fuel, and when there`s too much air or not enough fuel, it causes sneezing or popping sounds in the intake.
In carburetors that employ a power valve there is still a metering jet that controls the majority of the fuel control, however there is also a small valve that opens under wide open throttle conditions to deliver extra fuel for maximum power.
Fuel screw turned in (clockwise) gives a lean mixture and turned out (anti-clockwise) gives a rich mixture. Air screw turned in gives a rich mixture and turned out (anti-clockwise) gives a lean mixture. Lean means more air, less fuel. Rich means more fuel, less air.
With the fuel pressure gauge attached, start the engine and let it idle. Disconnect the vacuum hose from the pressure regulator; the pressure should drop approximately 8 to 10 PSI. If it does not, suspect a problem with the regulator or its` vacuum supply.
Many 2-cycle engines have problems and are sent to the junk yard before their time. Typical problems include hard starting, rough running, a need to adjust the carburetor during use to keep the engine from stalling, a need to rev the engine to keep it from dying, and not starting at all.
How many hours do boat engines last? Well-maintained inboard engines, inboard outboard engines (unless diesel), and outboards have a serviceable, average life of about 1500 – 2000 hours. If you`re looking at a gas-fueled marine engine close to or exceeding 1000 hours, inboard or outboard, proceed with caution.
Raising an outboard higher on the transom can reduce drag and raise top speed.
You most likely have a filter problem or fouled plugs. That could be why your boat motor is losing power. Solution: Replace the in-line fuel filter.
An engine that has a good oxygen flow should have a smooth and even purr. If your idle is rattly, or you hear a vibration or hiccup, you could be facing a bad air filter. A common culprit of this issue is polluted spark plugs from air intake issues.
The “Bog” simply means the engine is not receiving enough fuel when you go to wide open throttle. While there are other issues that may cause similar reactions within the carburetor, often the problem can be traced back to the accelerator pump system. Incorrect adjustment is the typical culprit.
Focus on Fluids

Just like a marathon runner, outboard engines need lots of fresh fluids to run their best. The obvious life-giving fluid for four-stroke outboards is internal engine oil, while for two-stroke outboards it`s two-stroke oil mixed with the gas.

To reduce wear and tear to the engine and ensure you get maximum fuel efficiency, it`s best to stay in the 2000-3000 RPM range when driving on a highway at 60-70 mph. If your car seems to be operating at a higher RPM in such a scenario, it`s better to head to an auto shop and check the engine.
The ideal RPM for any vehicle is 1500 RPM to 3000 RPM. In this range, you can save up on a lot of fuel by driving efficiently. The ideal RPM for any vehicle is 1500 RPM to 3000 RPM.
The most common method of temporarily increasing fuel or water storage is the use of deck-loaded storage tanks. Large boats often carry a barrel or two on deck. The main advantage is the simplicity of buying some fuel cans and setting them in place on deck.
Spun Prop A spun prop is one of the most common reasons your powerboat may struggle to achieve appropriate speed at full throttle. This happens when the bond between your boat propeller and the prop shaft is damaged. As a result of this damage, the rubber inserts start spinning independently.
A 4-blade prop can provide a competitive edge for boats requiring maximum speed and acceleration. The increased surface area and grip can help to deliver more power to the water, resulting in faster speeds and quicker acceleration.

Discover Relevant Questions and Answers for Your Specific Issue

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

I have a 1996 yamaha wave venture 1100….ran greatsat for 2 yrs..started but only ran for spray into carbs….drained fuel started and ran good. Started about month later and would only run as long as primed with starter fluids…checked fuel filter(ok)…fuel flow to fuel pump ok…output of fuel pump appears ok….but engine will only run as long as starter fluid/gas is sprayed into carbs. I don’t think it’s the carbs as it ran great a month ago…now it’s starving for gas flow….so it appears to be a fuel delivery problem…what would be the sequence of tests up to tearing into the carbs? is there a fuel filter inside the carbs? remember it fires off great when primed…until the fuel spray is consumed…
ANSWER : Check the on/off/reserve valve

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LX 188. Engine suddenly dies. The fluel in the bowel of the fuel filter is empty. If I crank the engine the filter becomes dry and is collapsing some but the engine does not start. When I remove the supply line from the fuel pump to the carberator and crank the enginge there is a strong stream of gas being pumped out. I tap on the carberator ??? is the float is hung not allowing fuel to enter. Cranking the engine with the line off refills the bowel of the gas filter. Reattache line to the carberator===engine starts. Ran perfect for 20minutes then suddenly died. Repeated all the above and engine again started. What to do to fix this? Thanks
ANSWER : Debrie inside the needle and seat area which has to be cleaned out with carburetor cleaner and compressed air

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My 1977 Evinrude 140 HP outboard engine looses power when it hits @4,200 rpm’s and goes down to 3,500 then back up to 4,200 and then back down to 3,000 or about there. This would continue if I didn’t slow down to 3,000 on my own. It runs fine at @ 3,000 when I slow it down. I have changed all the fuel lines from the fuel tank to the carbs, removed, cleaned out the fuel tank, put new gas and added a can of SeaFoam. I replaced the water seperator filter and cleaned the fuel filter. I feel the fuel pump is operating OK. Any ideas about what could be causing my problem? Could it be a bad power pack or stator? Help!!
ANSWER : Hi, this is obviously a stator problem since you have cleaned the fuel filter..

Take care

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Mar 12, 2010 – Could it be the check valve? I took it off and the flap appears to be working correctly. This well has been here a long time. Never given me any problems. I do have galvenized couplers on the discharge and intake sides. Old. Could these be leaking even though they show no sign of water? The discharge is able to hold 30 pounds easily overnight. I do not hear any vacuum in the intake when I take it off. Could the pipe to the well have a leak? I know I would have to insert a sleeve bnut I do not want to go through the hassle if I do not have to. I had put on a brand new pump from the hardware store that did the same thing so I think that would elliminate the pump as being the problem.
Mar 12, 2010 – I have a 3/4hp flotec convertible jet pump. It is able to hold 30lbs pressure on the discharge side as the primie easily for 24 hours. It is not able to pull water from the well whcih has been here for years. i disconnected it for the winter and rehooked it up. The galvanized couplers on the discharge and pump side are old but do not appear to be leakeing as I taped them well. The check valve seems to be functioning well as I took it off and the flap works correctly. The well is not pulling watrer. there does not appear to be a vacuum on the check vale when I losen it. could the check valve be bad? I am aware I might have to resleeve the well, but do not want to hassle with this if I do not have to. I want to eliminate everything else first. i put another brand new pump on it to see if it was that. That partiuclar pump which was the same thng did not work either.

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ANSWER : Your well has gone dry it seems. It has happened to my before. At first the new pump I purchased that did not pump I took back for exchange and still no water. I finally gave in and called the well experts and I was told the well was dried up

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Snow blower 1 year old, was using it ran out of gas , put in new gas, went to start, it ran for few seconds then dies,, prime it it runs few seconds dies, has NEW gas ans new plug, only runs for seconds after you prime it tons of times
ANSWER : If it has a fuel filter on it change it and that should get you going again. If not the dirt that was in the tank is prob in the carb cleaning the fuel bowl and jets should get you up to par. Hope that helps

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2004 KAWASAKI KXF250
ANSWER : Try a new plug sometimes a plug will not fire under compression. also adj the valves

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2011 ninja 1000 fuel pump not coming on
first cycle of the key, but injectors come on.

Engine killed when i hit a bump and let out clutch.
I restarted it and let out clutch and it killed again.
I parked the bike on the stand and let it sit for an hour, then i restarted it and the bike started up, when i gave it gas it backed fire.
Do you think it could be the fuel pump or relay? The shop thinks it could be the kick stand switch, but even acts up on neutral and the gas pump doesn’t come on first cycle of key when cold. Only injectors come on.

ANSWER : I would agree with the shop, as far as check the simply things first.while trouble shooting you want to start with the easy things, if you jump right into the pricey things and that is not it you have spent money and time and still have the problem. If you have a multimeter it will make this pretty easy. put your meter on the ohm setting and open and close the switch ( sidestand, clutch, ect.) if one of your safety swtich is not working right it will make your bike act up. start with that and if they are all working as they should please let me know and we can go deeper into it. I had a bike come into the shop that would cut out while riding, every bump every turn. I chased my tail because i didn’t start simple. i sent a lot of time and ended up paying for a fuel pump out of pocket because that wasn’t the problem. All the switches where working and nothing seemed right everything was working. after a few days while raising the bike on the left i notched the side stand moving a little with ever little bump on the way up. long story short the spring on the side stand had lost it’s ” spring” and won’t hold the side stand up right, every bump every turn the side stand moved a little letting the switch open and kill the bike .let me know what you find and if you need more help I’ll get and send you the wiring diagram and we can start work out the problem.M.Woodring

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