ud out or something like it i can let it idle and it is good till i hit the throttle and wants to bough down in rpm what can i do to fix it
Sport & Outdoor – Others

Experienced athletes share their insights in answering this question:
Considering the age of the machine, I would pull the motor out of the machine, buy a complete gasket and seal set (you can buy a piston kit with gaskets and seals for under $200) ,Tear it apart and replace the crank seals and all the gaskets. The old pistons have worn to an oval shape and are at high risk of breaking a skirt. New square pistons(side view) and rings will restore performance. Do the lightest hone possible on the cylinder. Inspect the intake manifolds for cracks or tears and reassemble the motor. The new seals, gaskets, and intake manifolds (if needed) should take care of the bogging. The new straight pistons will preserve your cylinders and raise compression. Taking apart and cleaning the carburetors while they are off will take care of any other potential motor issues and the rebuild should keep the motor alive for another thirty years. If all you want to do is get through another season out of the machine , grease the suspension, replace the crank seals, inspect or replace the intake manifolds, and clean the carburetors. The stock crank seals have a lip around the edge that requires you to split the cases to install them. They can be removed with out splitting the cases. But you will have to replace them with after market seals that are flat on the edge if you are planning on short cutting the repair.

How to Identify and Resolve Common Issues ?

We offer a diverse range of insights on identifying and resolving common problems in sports. Our sources encompass academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays shared by seasoned athletes. :

Your snowmobile won`t idle if the idle screw on the carburetor is not set correctly. The idle screw controls how fuel mixes with air at idle speed. Fortunately, you can adjust the idle screw within minutes. To adjust, you might need to remove the air filter and box so that you can see the carburetor.
A bad fuel pump or clogged fuel filter can keep your snowmobile from getting the fuel it needs to rev up your engine. This can cause your engine to crank, but fail to start.
A drastic reduction in fuel to air ratio within the carburetor is the primary reason why a snowmobile won`t run unless you put it on choke or half choke. The fuel air mixture will need to be fixed to run the snowmobile with the choke off.
Flooded Engine

A sled can flood if the engine is over-primed or over-choked. One way to correct this problem is to simply give it time. Let any extra fuel evaporate for about 20 minutes before restarting. You can also attempt to dry the spark plugs on your own if you don`t want to wait.

A snowmobile typically lasts between 5,000 and 20,000 miles, which could be 10-20 years depending on the brand and how it`s been ridden and cared for. A 2 stroke snowmobile engine will last around 5,000-10,000 miles while with proper maintenance a 4 stroke will last longer, approximately 10,000-20,000 miles.
Avoid opening and closing the throttle continuously, which causes inefficient fuel burning and increases emissions and noise. Don`t tamper with your exhaust pipes, as that causes the machine to exceed legal noise limits.
Generally, you will not damage your sled by using readily-available automotive fuel as long as it is of at least 87-octane and does not contain more than 10% ethanol. Avoid using E-15 or E-85 as they will damage the engine of any recreational vehicle.
Opening up the amount of air that can enter your engine is a great way to enhance your snowmobile performance. You can do that by simply swapping out your air box for an open element air filter. If you want to go further, you can also try a custom air intake system that will replace the existing setup entirely.
Why would the engine only run while the choke is on or with repeated manual priming? An engine that requires the choking (partial or full) after initial engine warm up is an indication that the engine fuel air mixture system is out of adjustment.
The choke increases the amount of fuel in the mixture, creating a richer mixture. This allows the engine to function at its best until it has warmed up enough to run on its normal operating fuel mixture.
In most cases, participants in watercross strip their snowmobiles of all non-essential parts—including the seat—to save weight. On June 25, 2013, Antti Holmberg of Finland set the record for snowmobile skipping at 180 km (112 miles).
With some special setup of the sled and boost levels set around 16psi, the highest water speed was just 87.7 MPH; nearly 20 MPH shy of the final run.
Usually, Yamaha 4-stroke sleds are considered the most reliable sleds of all time. That being said, no matter how low their market share is, Yamaha is the most reliable snowmobile brand in the industry.
The world record for a snowmobile`s top speed is 320 mile per hour by a G-Force-One, although this is a world record and exceptionally dangerous. The average highest speed for snowmobiles depends on the model but ranges around 95 miles per hour to 120 mph.
The average highest speed for snowmobiles depends on the engine size, make and model and a few other factors, but ranges around 95 to 120 miles per hour. Some of the higher speed snowmobiles can reach up to 150 mph, and there are also racing snowmobiles that can get up to 200 mph.
Yes this is bad for your engine for a multitude of reasons. In fact, it`s not good to run your engine at full throttle for extended periods of time unless the engine is designed to take it, whether it`s cold or warmed up.
The major break-in period for most sleds is considered 300 miles, or six to 10 hours. The piston rings seating with the cylinder bore is the major concern with the first period of use for any engine. During that break-in time, avoid jackrabbit starts, but constantly vary the engine speed.
You might surmise that when your car runs out of gas the engine simply stops running, but it typically doesn`t happen that way. Most often the car will show signs of “fuel starvation” that include engine sputter, intermittent power surges, and perhaps even engine backfires.
Darting occurs when the sled`s steering is responding to the direction of even small ruts in the trail rather than your steering input. As the sled encounters new ruts, it`s shifted in an unpredictable side-to-side manner.
Your starting issue could be damaged gaskets or maybe worn-out piston rings, scored cylinder or piston, bad crank seal, reed valve, or a damaged head gasket. Using a compression tester or contacting a place that can service your snowmobile will be the best way to go if the problem looks too serious.
A sled and its rider are moving at a speed of along a horizontal stretch of snow, as Figure 4.24a illustrates. The snow exerts a kinetic frictional force on the runners of the sled, so the sled slows down and eventually comes to a stop.
Your starting issue could be damaged gaskets or maybe worn-out piston rings, scored cylinder or piston, bad crank seal, reed valve, or a damaged head gasket. Using a compression tester or contacting a place that can service your snowmobile will be the best way to go if the problem looks too serious.
Darting occurs when the sled`s steering is responding to the direction of even small ruts in the trail rather than your steering input. As the sled encounters new ruts, it`s shifted in an unpredictable side-to-side manner.
Your starting issue could be damaged gaskets or maybe worn-out piston rings, scored cylinder or piston, bad crank seal, reed valve, or a damaged head gasket. Using a compression tester or contacting a place that can service your snowmobile will be the best way to go if the problem looks too serious.

Discover Relevant Questions and Answers for Your Specific Issue

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

I have a 99 yamaha f100 four stroke outboard. Problem I have is boat will acclereate fine get up on plane and after running for about a mob at wot will decell and only run around 4500 rpm. Then after coming back to idle will have a slight miss then run smooth and repeat every run. Changed the plugs and fuel filters alll oe yamaha has fresh oil timing belt is good any ideas will help or fuel psi spec. I am an ase master automotive tech so I know alot about engs. To me it feels like it’s running out of gas. Like the carb bows are full when I take off but then runs out after running wot. Any info will help
ANSWER : I have exactly the same problem with my Yamaha F100, have you got any solutions yet?

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Yamaha waverunner My 800xl will run, but will not get up to speed. When you first give it throttle it will take off fine, at first, then its as though some sensor holds it back. It begins idling rough if not shut off. Let it site for a minute and it will restart and do the same thing. Or it will let you idle back to short. But get into throttle and it bogs down. I’m thinking some sensor has identified a problem and holding it back to keep it from, I don’t know “Burning up”.
Any One have any idea’s. On tight bugget but still want to play.

Thanks for Any Help

ANSWER : Well if you have no money to fix it then no use figuring out what is wrong. Sorry but repairs take money, I am sure this is at least a $200-$400 USD repair job. Check your fuel pressure first.

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I have a 2001 Yamaha XL700Z Waverunner. The compression on both cylinders is about 120, it starts and runs fine – dry. Won’t quite idle, but I can start it and rev it up fine (for a short period, of course). However, as soon as it gets in the water, it will barely run – it will start and sputter and you cannot get it to run more than a few seconds or rev up. Take it back out, let it dry, starts & revs fine. It is not getting any water in the casing that I can tell, its almost as if water is getting something wet through the cooling system that I cannot see?
ANSWER : Try cleaning the carbs and the fuel lines, filter

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2005 Mercury 50hp 2-stroke outboard motor very sluggish when accelerating, stalled twice when trying to exceed 50% throttle capacity. Last time I used my boat was about two months ago, so I don’t think bad fuel is the problem. I let my boat idle at the boat launch for probably 5 mins before taking off. I didn’t notice any weird sounds or any indication that my motor was running any different than normal. After only a couple of minutes of running my boat up river I gave more throttle(probably 75% power) when it started to bog down. I immediatly kicked it out of gear and checked to see if something was caught around my prop but there was nothing there. From then on everytime I put the motor in gear and gave it throttle it would barely respond and stalled twice. Any suggestions to what this might be? Thanks, Newt.
ANSWER : The carberator is gravity fed and there is propbably gunk in it, when you give it more throttle, it needs more gas but can’t get it. Then a build up of gas in the float bowl occurs and nothing works right. It has happened to me and its aggravating, do a complete rebuild on the carb or just replace it and you will be happier quicker.

Hope this helps, Coachtheune

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HI!
I continually get code 90 (low/NO flow) from my 8111. I have disassembled, cleaned EVERYTHING, including the inlet port AT the pump (remind everybody to check this as stuff gets past the filter basket and will plug the pump inlet).

There is No air in the system and I get superb pressure at the outlet, yet I still get code 90. I again removed the flow sensor and put my ohm meter across the flow sensor terminals and activated the flapper and measured an open circuit. I used a heavier magnet to see if I could get make the internals of the sensor move to get an ohm reading, but I get nothing but an open circuit, ie: no measured resistance.

Can I simply bypass the defective flow sensor to trick the 8111 to think it has full flow without damaging the ‘brain’ of the system.?

Intex corp is useless at these questions. They have been out of stock on this sensor for months and are telling me “two weeks” for two months and now it’s “end of August” which I do not believe. Meanwhile I am making no chlorine while the 90 code is showing.

I love the 8111, this is the first problem I’ve had with it, and I’m frustrated that I can not get such an important part from them.

Thanks for listening!

ANSWER : Have you been able to find a solution to this problem. I am having the same issue.

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Suddenly stops recodring
ANSWER : I love my Sanyo mp3 recorder I’ve been using it in church for 4 or 5 years. It never quits it can hold an extra gig with a chip and i can plug it into my computer to upload it in seconds. I say replace the old recorder

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JD 212 starts right up, runs fine at an idle through mid throttle, but acts as if it is running under very heavy load if you try to speed it up to full throttle, and it will die if throttle is not reduced. There is plenty of fuel getting to the carb.
ANSWER : Hi, try it with the air filter removed and replace it if necessary. Also, does it completely die if you don’t reduce the throttle or does it die down and rev up again on its own ? Regards Phil.

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