Champion

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Jessy is correct, but there are a number of other points to note. You didn\’t mention the aircraft type nor engine type, so I can\’t be too specific. The location of the battery is important; some aircraft have the battery in the back, some under a seat and some in the engine bay. The distance from the battery will have an effect on the starter. Earlier aircraft types have been known to have aluminium battery cables. If they are fitted on your aircraft you should change them to copper. (Most copper cables will be \’tinned\’ so they will look silver, don\’t confuse them with aluminium). The engine is mounted with rubber mounting blocks, there should be a large earth strap or cable fixed to the engine from a \’ground\’ point on the aircraft or engine mount. This earth lead is very important and should be very well secured. If it is not the starter will find an earth through other electrical leads such as the \’screening\’ around the magneto switch leads or the alternator field leads. This can cause a fire. What I normally do is to take each earth lead and secure it using a \’shakeproof\’ or \’star\’ type locking washer between the lead head and the engine or airframe ground point, (like a sandwich). This helps to make a sound connection. The live leads should not be overlooked either, nor the condition of the battery and the battery terminals. Lastly, some of the smaller aircraft engines were plagued with bad starting due to the fact that the starter turned the engine too fast and the magneto impulse coupling retracted so not allowing the impulse to catch on the impulse pawl, thus the ignition was not retarded nor was the impulse \’wound up\’ to give a good spark. The solution to this problem was to fit starters with a different gearing that slowed down the cranking speed. There is a Lycoming service letter on this subject. So, check that you have the correct starter fitted to the engine type – not all starters are the same!

How to Identify and Resolve Common Issues ?

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Slow cranking could be the result of several possible conditions, and as you`ve suggested, the fault might reappear or worsen. Possible causes are a degraded or defective battery, faulty electrical connection, a charging system problem, a bad starter or battery rundown when parked.
The starter motor in a 12V automobile ignition system has an internal resistance of 0.05 ohms.
: lack of success at first.
Starters do wear out or fail over time. However, they usually have several warning signs that they`re on the way out, and mechanics may ask you about them if you take your vehicle into an auto repair shop.
Does the starter fail to crank the engine? The starter is designed to turn at a specified rotational speed to crank the engine, but if there is a high resistance somewhere in the starting control circuit, or the battery connections or cables are corroded or dirty, this will cause the starter to turn too slowly.
How many ohms should a starter solenoid read? The resistance should be between 0.2 and 0.6 ohms, which is a sign that the solenoid is in good working order. If you get any other reading, then it means that your starter solenoid needs to be replaced.
Sometimes the microbes in your starter simply need time to metabolize all the feedings. This is usually the case in cold environments (AC under 70F, winter kitchens). If your starter is barely bubbling or not bubbling at all 12-24 hours after the last feeding, simply stir it again and let the jar sit for a day or two.
A slow cranking starter or no crank at all may be caused by a faulty ground that prevents full voltage to the starter motor.
A bad coolant sensor, a bad throttle position sensor (TPS), a bad fuel pump or a plugged fuel filter can all cause a lean condition causing long cranking times. Sometimes the spark is delivered late, weak or not at all.
The simplest cause of this sort of fault is a loose or corroded electrical connection. If there is a fault with the internal windings of the starter motor, bad brushes, or other electrical faults, the starter motor may lack the torque to crank the engine.
This issue is often caused by a burned-out/ fused starter solenoid or motor. Alternatively, this can also be caused by a dead battery. But whatever the cause maybe, if you experience nothing when you try to turn on the ignition, make sure to get your vehicle thoroughly checked.
The electrical resistance (ohms) is in the copper windings which are in the starter motor. The total resistance (ohms) of the windings is under 0.1 ohms, usually.
Sometimes the microbes in your starter simply need time to metabolize all the feedings. This is usually the case in cold environments (AC under 70F, winter kitchens). If your starter is barely bubbling or not bubbling at all 12-24 hours after the last feeding, simply stir it again and let the jar sit for a day or two.
Ohm defines the unit of resistance of “1 Ohm” as the resistance between two points in a conductor where the application of 1 volt will push 1 ampere, or 6.241×10^18 electrons. This value is usually represented in schematics with the greek letter “Ω”, which is called omega, and pronounced “ohm”.
Sometimes the microbes in your starter simply need time to metabolize all the feedings. This is usually the case in cold environments (AC under 70F, winter kitchens). If your starter is barely bubbling or not bubbling at all 12-24 hours after the last feeding, simply stir it again and let the jar sit for a day or two.
Electrical connections faulty. Solenoid switch (engaging relay) stiff or faulty. Electric motor damaged electrically. Single-pinion gear, starter pinion or freewheel damaged.
A bad coolant sensor, a bad throttle position sensor (TPS), a bad fuel pump or a plugged fuel filter can all cause a lean condition causing long cranking times. Sometimes the spark is delivered late, weak or not at all.

Discover Relevant Questions and Answers for Your Specific Issue

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Could the resistance to the starter be the reason that my starter is starting slow?
ANSWER : Jessy is correct, but there are a number of other points to note. You didn\’t mention the aircraft type nor engine type, so I can\’t be too specific. The location of the battery is important; some aircraft have the battery in the back, some under a seat and some in the engine bay. The distance from the battery will have an effect on the starter. Earlier aircraft types have been known to have aluminium battery cables. If they are fitted on your aircraft you should change them to copper. (Most copper cables will be \’tinned\’ so they will look silver, don\’t confuse them with aluminium). The engine is mounted with rubber mounting blocks, there should be a large earth strap or cable fixed to the engine from a \’ground\’ point on the aircraft or engine mount. This earth lead is very important and should be very well secured. If it is not the starter will find an earth through other electrical leads such as the \’screening\’ around the magneto switch leads or the alternator field leads. This can cause a fire. What I normally do is to take each earth lead and secure it using a \’shakeproof\’ or \’star\’ type locking washer between the lead head and the engine or airframe ground point, (like a sandwich). This helps to make a sound connection. The live leads should not be overlooked either, nor the condition of the battery and the battery terminals. Lastly, some of the smaller aircraft engines were plagued with bad starting due to the fact that the starter turned the engine too fast and the magneto impulse coupling retracted so not allowing the impulse to catch on the impulse pawl, thus the ignition was not retarded nor was the impulse \’wound up\’ to give a good spark. The solution to this problem was to fit starters with a different gearing that slowed down the cranking speed. There is a Lycoming service letter on this subject. So, check that you have the correct starter fitted to the engine type – not all starters are the same!

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Starting my Mojave 250
ANSWER : I’m having the same problem I guess it popular in mojave I changed the plug and I still get Orange spark is there any ideas it won’t kick start when cold but once warm she runs great and will kick start

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I have a Kohler Condidant 5 Generator that will run as long as you hold the start button in. It dies when you let off. I have a harness for the remote switch but no switch – It also will start the generator when you cross the red and black wire and run as long as you hold them together. There are 3 wires to the main switch and 5 to the remote switch. Does the starter stay engaged the whole time you hold the start switch or does the computer release the starter once it is running? The Generator is producing electricity because I tested it while holding the start button. Some where is a wire that shold tell it to keep running. I have read online many descriptions of the same problem, most are told the board is bad so they replace it and still have the problem. Have not found a solution. Talked to a marine machanic today and he said he fixed his friends generator doing the same thing by running a bypass wire but he couldnt remember exactly what he did it was a long time ago. Can anyone help me. Thank you
ANSWER : The problem is either the ballast resistor or the starter bypass relay. The bypass relay should be part of the starter solenoid. I’m afraid I can’t tell you exactly where the ballast resistor is located. It should be a physically fairly large resistor made of ceramic. It should be retangular roughly 1.5″-3″ long and 3/8″-1/2″ accross with a wire on each end. It could also be a coil of wire mounted on a phenolic board.
If you need more help just add a comment and I’ll respond as soon as I get the message.

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Have a john deere 318 riding lawn mower. it had been hard to start with it taking several turns of the key to do anything, then would not always engage. once engaged, would start with no problem. now when the key is turned, does nothing. checked 2 fuses near battery and tried jumping but no change. suspect starter and or solenoid. john deer shop claims starter price is $505 with almost 4 hrs labor too. is there good way to test to see if starter, solenoid, condenser, switch, etc is problem? what is the easiest way to access and remove the staqrter and solenoid? is there a relatively cheap equivalent to this starter and solenoid?
ANSWER : Usually the shop would make the fixing of an item to look so complicated this is usually to ensure that the customer comes back. To confirm if the starter is the cause of the machine not starting. tell the shop to check the machine if either of the 2 options are the cause of the problem as they will have setup procedures for doing this. Do not settle for cheaper equivalent as this will only cause further damage to the unit. It is rather concrete that starting problems are caused by the starter.Hope this has been helpful?

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Water build up in the starter & Reqoil case of my Polaris ATV
ANSWER : Your drain plugs should be visable, if they exist, on the lowest point of the body of the device. If you can’t readily see them, consider drying out the entire unit with a hair dryer and a little patience in drying the entire unit. From then on, I would consider evaluating the depth of water before entering. After all, the unit may not be amphibious, which sounds like your intended use!
Also, the battery may be affected by the extreme cold, as they often are, leaving a different approach to this problem. Good Luck!

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I have a 1996 yamaha wave venture 1100….ran greatsat for 2 yrs..started but only ran for spray into carbs….drained fuel started and ran good. Started about month later and would only run as long as primed with starter fluids…checked fuel filter(ok)…fuel flow to fuel pump ok…output of fuel pump appears ok….but engine will only run as long as starter fluid/gas is sprayed into carbs. I don’t think it’s the carbs as it ran great a month ago…now it’s starving for gas flow….so it appears to be a fuel delivery problem…what would be the sequence of tests up to tearing into the carbs? is there a fuel filter inside the carbs? remember it fires off great when primed…until the fuel spray is consumed…
ANSWER : Check the on/off/reserve valve

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I have a problem with my machine, on occasion, not recognizing when I’m starting, and the display will not start. I have to remove one of the batteries or it will stay on forever. When it starts up, it works fine, no complaints whatsoever. But lately, I’ve not been able to use it due to the start-up problem. I put the batteries in, the display comes on, but it will not start up when I begin motion. The control buttons will not work, either. Please inform me what it is I can do to fix this problem. Thank You
ANSWER : Troubleshooting on this model is very limited to anyone but the vendor. I would recommend sharing the symptoms with a representative from fitnessquest here.
Good luck

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